hitchhikersguidetothegalaxy:

larrycoincidences:

do you ever have a plan for the day and suddenly it’s 4pm and you’ve achieved literally nothing 

I believe Douglas Adams and John Lloyd came up with a word for this feeling. image

(via sarahreesbrennan)

not-princehamlet:

peegan:

i just ran onto my porch and screamed “CAN I JUST FUCKING BE GOOD ENOUGH TO ACTUALLY MAKE YOU FEEL SOMETHING” and a guy rode by on a bike and screamed “YOU ARE PERFECT AND YOU MAKE ME FEEL ALIVE”

wow fuck thank you stranger thank you very much

#i want to write a love story that starts this way

(via ineedanumbrella)

real-life-dipper-pines:

khymeira:

Lumigrids » 2012 [Source]

"Lumigrids is an LED projector for bicycles, which aims to improve safety during night riding. It projects square grids onto the ground. By observing changes in the grids, the rider can easily comprehend the landforms ahead."

at last, we can all train for for the inevitable Tron game we will all fall into.

(Source: clock510, via ineedanumbrella)

I know y’all like sinks and shit but lets talk about toasters

bandgeek-musicfreak:

ciel-the-neko-overlord:

image

This one looks like a scanner

image

This one poaches eggs too

image

Fucking hamster wheels

image

This ones see through

image

Awesomeness

image

This one hangs on the fucking wall

image

It’s like a flower

image

Hand held toaster

image

Need a reminder? write it on your toast

image

No school like the old school

image

WERE LOSING HIM SIR NOT ON MY WATCH

image

 Now you know todays weather

i didn’t realize that a toaster fandom actually existed. this is beautiful. 

(via cassietotallyjust)

cas-you-assbutt:

claire-fairy:

I COULD SLAY 10,000 WARRIORS FOR THE ROMAN EMPIRE IN THOSE SHOES

I WOULD SLAY 10,000 WARRIORS FOR THE ROMAN EMPIRE FOR THOSE SHOES

cas-you-assbutt:

claire-fairy:

I COULD SLAY 10,000 WARRIORS FOR THE ROMAN EMPIRE IN THOSE SHOES

I WOULD SLAY 10,000 WARRIORS FOR THE ROMAN EMPIRE FOR THOSE SHOES

(Source: asylum-art, via endlessnut)

thebigbadafro:


nieceoftheserpent:

theskaldspeaks:

needtherapy:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math


Awesome, dude. Awesome. I mean, AWESOME.

WHAT AN EPIC BADASS!

This man is awesome!

I hope that’s his wife putting pads together in the back. His swag is on 5hunna just because he’s part of the gotdamn solution!

thebigbadafro:

nieceoftheserpent:

theskaldspeaks:

needtherapy:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. 

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. 

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. 

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” 

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. 

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. 

To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/

To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/

For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281

To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229

And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

Awesome, dude. Awesome. I mean, AWESOME.

WHAT AN EPIC BADASS!

This man is awesome!

I hope that’s his wife putting pads together in the back. His swag is on 5hunna just because he’s part of the gotdamn solution!

(via cassietotallyjust)

(Source: truthfacts.com, via endlessnut)

phobias:

avoiding hate like

image

(via estellecampanella)

isaia:

revereche:

mantisbutts:

reapergrellsutcliff:

Fashions of the Future as Imagined in 1893

Illustrations from “Future Dictates of Fashion” by W. Cade Gall that was published in the January 1893 issue of The Strand magazine.

At first I thought this was some “fashion of witches and wizards through the ages” type thing but nah everyone is supposed to dress like this. I wish everyone dressed like this. 

nailed it

Welp
it can’t be anymore ridonkulous than how we predict the future of fashion in the 2020s-2050s

thepenguingeneral:

edgebug:

sincerely, a person who has been on prozac for 9 years

this is in response to some shitty stuff i’ve seen on my dash recently. it’s super simplified, so if you’d like to know some more indepth stuff on how exactly it works, google it—OR BETTER YET actually talk to a mental health doctor psychiatrist person wow

Yes pls

(via allaboutmanga)

wildsoulchiild:

fanofallshippers:

icequeen102990:

glampora:

heytheresuckyq:

findinglady:

PLEASE PASS THIS ON! 
I want to make sure every one knows about this and what it can do to your pets 
this is what has happened to my sisters cat after she wore a hartz flea and tick collar and now has a burn like wound on her neck. please pass this on and do not buy hartz’s products! they use poison in their products pets have died because of this!!
http://www.hartzvictims.org/

Yes this is my cat she is doing fine at the moment but I’m so sorry for the people who’s pets are not so lucky

oh my god
PLEASE REBLOG THIS PEOPLE
save pets!

Hartz is the worse EVER! my aunt used it and it ended up killing two of her cats. only one survived but she had the worse skin condition. NEVER USE HARTZ

BETTER REBLOG THISS!!!

Guys this is an actual issue. We had Hartz collars for my dog and he kept having seizures. one seizure he had on the stairs and fell backwards down the stairs, and he also stop breathing from these seizures. When I found out about Hartz causing this I took it off my dog and he hasn’t had a seizure since. And he used to have one at least every few months. DON’T USE HARTZ.

wildsoulchiild:

fanofallshippers:

icequeen102990:

glampora:

heytheresuckyq:

findinglady:

PLEASE PASS THIS ON! 

I want to make sure every one knows about this and what it can do to your pets 

this is what has happened to my sisters cat after she wore a hartz flea and tick collar and now has a burn like wound on her neck. please pass this on and do not buy hartz’s products! they use poison in their products pets have died because of this!!

http://www.hartzvictims.org/

Yes this is my cat she is doing fine at the moment but I’m so sorry for the people who’s pets are not so lucky

oh my god

PLEASE REBLOG THIS PEOPLE

save pets!

Hartz is the worse EVER! my aunt used it and it ended up killing two of her cats. only one survived but she had the worse skin condition. NEVER USE HARTZ

BETTER REBLOG THISS!!!

Guys this is an actual issue. We had Hartz collars for my dog and he kept having seizures. one seizure he had on the stairs and fell backwards down the stairs, and he also stop breathing from these seizures. When I found out about Hartz causing this I took it off my dog and he hasn’t had a seizure since. And he used to have one at least every few months. DON’T USE HARTZ.

(via minuiko)

heavensmoratorium:

heavensmoratorium:

demisexuals are born when godsexuals procreate with humansexuals and nothing can convince me otherwise that i have some secretly erotic superpowers

why did i even write this post

arkiarus:

kyleehenke:

What it feels like to stumble across an old fandom of yours :D

for real tho this website needs to be more proud about its past interests or at least open about them

(via estellecampanella)

nebulasnovasandnightsky:

look if you unironically say ‘money can’t buy happiness’ then either you’ve never faced a real financial struggle or you’ve achieved enlightenment, because goddamn does financial security feel an awful lot like happiness when it’s something you’re not used to

(via sorasan00)

itsraininbritishmen:

wAT THE FUCK AM I  LOOKING AT

(Source: victoryandjustice, via cassietotallyjust)